"For my part I know nothing with any certainty, but the sight of the stars makes me dream." ― Vincent van Gogh
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April 25, 2019

Vanished

Seascape near Les Saintes-Maries-de-la-Mer by Vincent van Gogh
Fiction: Vanished

He had vanished at sea. But he left things behind. One letter of farewell to his parents and a second one to his brother. A pair of wore out black boots was left in the closet. A white shirt gown that he slept in laid on the bed that had been made. A dying cactus was on the window sill. And a book of poems by E. Vincent Millay was left on his desk. But none of these things said where he went or why he left.

A few people saw a man by the sea. He was dressed in a long gray coat with his black hair covered by a tweed cap and he carried a small, pale brown valise. A young woman said she saw the man looking at the boats passing back and forth. Another said he was interested in the waves and had even walked close to the edge and gotten his coat wet. And a third said the man had cried and kicked at the sand with his boots. No one saw him walked away, only that he was there one moment and the next he was gone.

Days, weeks, months and then years went by but no signs of the man. If he had been anywhere, no one had seen him.

Some nearly fifteen years later, on a cold morning with the winter sun weakly shining down, a man wearing a gray coat with a tweed cap over his head and carrying a brown valise appeared at the sea. One old woman was walking by as she usually did on weekday mornings. She saw the man and stopped. It was unusual to see anyone there at this early hour.

But when she saw his face, she thought of the time when she was questioned about a man gone missing at this same spot. But the old woman's eyes had been troubling her for a while now so she was not certain if this was the same man.

The man came closer and spoke with a gentle voice. "Will the boats be passing by soon?" he asked.

"Not anymore. They have closed the border. No more boats pass through here," the old woman replied.

The man's thin lips quivered but it formed a smile. His face was lined with years and yet, his eyes were bright and young. He nodded and switched the handle of his valise to his other hand. Then he turned his attention back to the sea. The old woman noted the torn corner in the fabric of his valise. His coat had a frayed edge at the hem. A few strands of his hair peeking out of his cap were white.

A sudden wind blew with a furious motion and caused the old woman to cover her eyes. When she dropped her hand, the man was gone.

April A-Z Challenge 2019

8 comments:

  1. Replies
    1. probably...

      thank you for stopping by, have a lovely day.

      Delete
  2. As Elephant's Child says, a haunting story. I like your description of this man - or ghost - as young and old, I can almost see him. Have you drawn him, or are you going to?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. no, I have no plans of drawing this man although I can pictured him quite well..

      thank you for stopping by, have a lovely day.

      Delete
  3. A curious man. Was he ever there? Is he still there, but not to be seen? Will he return?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I don't know. I have read about missing people and the mystery of their disappearances are never solved.

      thank you for stopping by, have a lovely day.

      Delete
  4. Replies
    1. I think so too.

      thank you for stopping by, have a lovely day.

      Delete

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